The Existence of Elohim/Alahiym

On July 24, 2014, in Bible Lessons, by Milton Carnes

This article explores the existence of the Mighty Ones from nature and the Scriptures. This is an eight (8) page PDF download.

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The Name of The Most High Revealed

On December 6, 2012, in The Name, by Milton Carnes

Is his name Jehovah, Yahweh, Yahwah, Ahayah, Ha Shem, Adonai, God, The Lord, Yahuah, Yahawah, Yahuwah, Yehuveh, Yehoweh or some other name?

Let us start out by looking at Psalm 68:4

Out of 13 different Bible translations of Psalm 68:4

6 translations use the name “The Lord”
5 translations use the name “Jah”
1 translation has the name “Jehovah”
1 translation has the name “Yah”

See for yourself and then let the scriptures speak!

NIV – Psa 68:4 – Sing to God, sing praise to his name, extol him who rides on the clouds*— his name is the Lord— and rejoice before him. © Info: – The Holy Bible, New International Version © 1973, 1978, 1984 International Bible Society

KJV – Psa 68:4 – Sing unto God, sing praises to his name: extol him that rideth upon the heavens by his name JAH, and rejoice before him. © Info: – King James Version 1769

NKJV – Psa 68:4 – Sing to God, sing praises to His name; Extol Him who rides on the clouds,* By His name YAH, And rejoice before Him. © Info: – New King James Version © 1982 Thomas Nelson

NLT – Psa 68:4 – Sing praises to God and to his name! Sing loud praises to him who rides the clouds. His name is the LORD– rejoice in his presence! © Info: – New Living Translation © 1996 Tyndale Charitable Trust

ESV – Psa 68:4 – Sing to God, sing praises to his name; lift up a song to him who rides through the deserts; his name is the Lord; exult before him! © Info: – English Standard Version © 2001 Crossway Bibles

RVR – Psa 68:4 – Cantad a Dios, cantad salmos a su nombre; Exaltad al que cabalga sobre los cielos. *JAH es su nombre; alegraos delante de él. © Info: – Reina-Valera © 1960 Sociedades Bíblicas en América Latina * Note: Names are not translated from language to language but transliterated.

NASB – Psa 68:4 – Sing to God, sing praises to His name; Lift up a song for Him who rides through the deserts, Whose name is the LORD, and exult before Him. © Info: – New American Standard Bible © 1995 Lockman Foundation

RSV – Psa 68:4 – Sing to God, sing praises to his name; lift up a song to him who rides upon the clouds; his name is the LORD, exult before him! © Info: – Revised Standard Version © 1947, 1952.

ASV – Psa 68:4 – Sing unto God, sing praises to his name: Cast up a highway for him that rideth through the deserts; His name is Jehovah; and exult ye before him. © Info: – American Standard Version 1901 Info

YNG – Psa 68:4 – Sing ye to God — praise His name, Raise up a highway for Him who is riding in deserts, In Jah [is] His name, and exult before Him. © Info: – Robert Young Literal Translation 1862, 1887, 1898

DBY – Psa 68:4 – Sing unto God, sing forth his name; cast up a way for him that rideth in the deserts: his name is Jah; and rejoice before him. © Info: – J.N.Darby Translation 1890

WEB – Psa 68:4 – Sing to God, sing praises to his name: extol him that rideth upon the heavens by his name JAH, and rejoice before him. © Info: – Noah Webster Version 1833

HNV – Psa 68:4 – Sing to God! Sing praises to his name! Extol him who rides on the clouds: To the LORD, his name! Rejoice before him! © Info: – Hebrew Names Version 2000


 
What we do know for sure is that the Hebrew language both modern and ancient has no “j” sound in it. Therefore, the name “JAH” is incorrect.

Now let’s look at some of the 48 scriptures containing the name “Yah” that has been replaced:


 
Lastly, what do we know about the name (YHUH) also called the Tetragrammaton?

YHWH or YHUH (Yod Hey Waw Hey) is listed as Strong’s #H3068 but there is also a 3 letter spelling also listed as Yahu (Yod Hey Waw) from Strong’s #H3068 (See Brown Driver & Briggs; ppg 397a & 397b)

We do know that the beginning of the name YHUH is “Yah” (The YH).
 
In the ancient language, these letters do not exist: J, W, V. The letter commonly called W (waw) and V (vav) is actually a vowel that produce the U or “oo” sound in English.
 
How do we know this? The Etymology of Hebrew Words or Root Words will clearly reveal this. This can be found in any good Hebrew to English Concordance. I suggest you use The Blue Letter Bible at http://www.blueletterbible.org/
 
The ancient language consist of mostly consonants. There are three natural vowels in the ancient language: A = “ah sound”, U = “oo sound” and Y = “Y consonant” or “vowel I”. The ancient language does not have the vowel points used by the modern Hebrew. The vowel points were added to the text.
 
Rules to the language
#1. When two consonants are together, the vowel “A” which carries the “ah” sound is added in between the letters or consonants. For example, YH becomes YAH and it is pronounced YahH.
 
#2. Every syllable must begin with one consonant and have only one vowel. The exception would be any word that start with the letter “U”. Two vowels CANNOT be put together in a word or in a syllable. The letter “A” which carries the “ah” sound is never used before or after the letter “U” or “oo” sound.

#3. A Hebrew syllable begins with a consonant. A syllable can be either a consonant plus a vowel (CV) or a consonant plus a vowel plus a consonant (CVC).

Therefore YHWH or YHVH should read YHUH and this name should be pronounced “YA” as the first syllable and “HUH” (as in Winnie The Pooh) as the second syllable or YAHUH (pronounced YAHOOH) as the complete name. The final “H” is silent (Yahu). The short form of the name is “YAH” and the long form is “YAHUH” or “YAHU”. We see the long form in the names of the prophets and the name of The Messiah.

AchazYAHU “YAHU has Seized”
AchiYAHU “Brother of YAHU
AdoniYAHU “My Master is YAHU
AdaYAHU “YAHU is Adorned
AmarYAHU “YAHU has Said”
AtsalYAHU “Strength of YAHU”
AzanYAHU “YAHU has Reserved”
BaqbukYAHU “Heard by YAHU”
BenaYAHU “YAHU has Built”
ChananYAHU “YAHU has Favored”
ChizqiYAHU “Portion of YAHU”
DelaYAHU “YAHU has Delivered”
EliYAHU “My El is YAHU”
GedalYAHU “YAHU is Great”
GemarYAHU “YAHU has Perfected”
KenahYAHU “YAHU has Planted”
KonYAHU “YAHU will Establish”
KownanYAHU “YAHU has Sustained”
Ma’azYAHU “Rescue of YAHU”
MalikiYAHU “YAHU is King”
MattanYAHU “Gift of YAHU”
MattithYAHU “Gift of YAHU”
MeshalemYAHU “Ally of YAHU”
MiqneYAHU “Possession of YAHU”
Miyka YAHU “Who is like YAHU”
NathanYAHU “Gift of YAHU”
NehemYAHU “Comfort of YAHU”
ObadYAHU “Serving YAHU”
SemakYAHU “Supported of YAHU”
TebalYAHU “YAHU has Dipped”
TowbiYAHU “Goodness of YAHU”
TsephanYAHU “YAHU has Secreted”
UwriYAHU “Flame of YAHU”
UzziYAHU “Strength of YAHU”
Ya’azanYAHU “Heard of YAHU”
YeberekYAHU “Blessed of YAHU”
YechdiYAHU “Unity of YAHU”
YekonYAHU “YAHU will Establish”
YigdalYAHU “Magnified of YAHU”
Yish’shiYAHU “YAHU will Hear”
YoshiYAHU “YAHU will Lend”
ZebadYAHU “YAHU has Given”
ZekarYAHU “YAHU has Remembered”
ZerachYAHU “YAHU has Risen!”

* Hallelujah (“j” but pronounced with the “y” sound) which means “Praise Yah”.


- Produces a “Y” or “I” sound.


- As a Hebrew letter, it produces the “H”.


- Also called “Vav” or “Waw” but should be “Uau”. As a Hebrew vowel, it produces an “oo” (u) sound.


- As a Hebrew letter, it produces the “H” sound in english. This letter is typically silent when it follows the vowel “U” with the “oo” sound.

We do know that YHUH is not pronounced “Yahovah” (YHVH) because of the Germanic influence on the modern day Hebrew language. There is no “V” sound in the ancient Hebrew language. JHVH commonly called JeHovah is closely related to YHUH but more accurately pronounced YAHUH.

The Germanic influence on the Hebrew language came from the Ashkenazi Jews. Ashkenazi Jews are descended from the medieval Jewish communities along the Rhine in Germany from Alsace in the south to the Rhineland in the north. Ashkenaz is the medieval Hebrew name for this region and for Germany.

Many Ashkenazi Jews later migrated, largely eastward, forming communities in non German speaking areas, including Hungary, Poland, Belarus, Lithuania, Russia, Ukraine, Eastern Europe. These were the people persecuted by Adolph Hitler.
 
Genesis 10:1-3 (King James Version)
1 Now these are the generations of the sons of Noah, Shem, Ham, and Japheth: and unto them were sons born after the flood.
2 The sons of Japheth; Gomer, and Magog, and Madai, and Javan, and Tubal, and Meshech, and Tiras.
3 And the sons of Gomer; Ashkenaz, and Riphath, and Togarmah.

IEUE

This is a Greek to English transliteration from the Hebrew. The Greek language does not have a letter for letter transliteration from the Hebrew language. In the Greek language, the letters “Y” and the letter “H” do not appear. Because of this, the Greeks used the letters that closely matched the sounds of the Hebrew language. Thus we have IEUE instead of YHUH. English is a better language for transliterating from Hebrew because of its ability to almost match Hebrew letter for letter.

YaHaWaH?

This name recognizes the “A-Type Vowel”. However, the letter “W” is an English letter which does not appear in Biblical Hebrew. The letter “W” carries the “U” sound in Hebrew. An example of this sound would be in the name Winnie The Pooh. This name and language type (Lashawan Qadash) was invented by Priest Ahrayah from Harlem, New York in 1960’s. For instance, shalom would be Shalawam, Halaluyah would be Halalawayah and of course YHWH would be Yahawah. For a more detailed study on why this CAN NOT be the language of “The Book” CLICK HERE

Yahweh?

This name partially recognizes the “A-type Vowel” in the first two letters but ignores it in the last two letters. The letter “W” is an English letter which does not appear in Biblical Hebrew. The letter “W” carries the “U” sound in Hebrew. An example of the sound would be in the name Winnie The Pooh. The letter “E” appears in Modern Hebrew and it can only be generated through vowel points which were added to the Biblical Text. The “A-Type Vowel” is put in between two consonants, but the creators of this name forgot to put the “A-Type Vowel” in between the letter “H” and the letter “W”.

Yehoveh, Yehoweh, Yehuveh, Yehuweh?

These names partially recognize the “A-Type Vowel”. The letters “V” & “W” are English letters with German influence upon it. The letters “V” & “W” do not appear in Biblical Hebrew. The letters “V” & ”W” both carry the “U” sound in Hebrew. An example of the sound would be in the name Winnie The Pooh. The letter “O” appears in Modern Hebrew and it can only be generated through vowel points which were added to the Biblical Text. These names also recognize that two vowels cannot be in one syllable nor can two vowels appear together in one word. The creators of these names made up a vowel consonant called the “OV” & “OW” to compensate for the two vowel rule.

“Yeh” is more of a Modern Hebrew name as opposed to YAH being more ancient. “Yeh” is used mostly by those that have a connection to the Jewish Community while YAH is mostly used by Hebrews. There are some exceptions because this is NOT absolute. Moses/Moshe/Masha/Musha would not have called The Most High “YEH” but “YAH”. Psalm 68:4 reveals that “YAH” is more correct as opposed to “YEH”.

Finally, the word Hallelujah (Halaluyah) is a transliteration of the Hebrew word הַלְּלוּיָהּ which is composed of two elements: הַלְּלוּ a command to “praise” יָהּ (Yah) not Yeh.

Nearly all English versions of the Hebrew Bible translate the word as “Praise (ye) the LORD. Rarely do they transliterate the word as either “Hallelujah”, “Halleluyah” or “Alleluia”. There is no Halleluyeh pronunciation of the word Halleluyah.

“YEH” is typically used in Jewish Circles when beginning a word or name but rarely used when ending a word or name. An example would be Eliyah but you will never see Eliyeh.

Yahovah & Yahowah?

This name partially recognizes the “A-Type Vowel”. The letters “V” & “W” are English letters with German influence upon it. The letters “V” & “W” do not appear in Biblical Hebrew. The letters “V” &”W” both carry the “U” sound in Hebrew. An example of this sound would be in the name Winnie The Pooh. The letter “O” appears in Modern Hebrew and it can only be generated through vowel points which were added to the Biblical Text. This name also recognizes that two vowels cannot appear in one syllable nor can two vowels appear together in one word. The creators of these names made a vowel consonant called the “OV” & “OW” to compensate for the two vowel rule.

Yahwah?

This name recognizes the “A-Type Vowel”. However, the “W” is an English letter that does not appear in Biblical Hebrew. The letter “W” carries the “U” sound in Hebrew. An example of this sound would be in the name Winnie The Pooh. The “A-Type Vowel” is put in between two consonants, but the creators of this name forgot to put the “A-Type Vowel” in between the letter “H” and the letter “W”.

Yahuwah?

The letter “W” is an English letter that does not appear in Biblical Hebrew. “W” carries the “U” sound originally in Hebrew. An example of this sound would be in the name Winnie The Pooh. This name also recognizes that two vowels cannot be in one syllable nor can two vowels appear together in one word. The creators of this name made a vowel consonant called the “UW” to compensate for the two vowel rule.

Yahuah?

This name is saying a lot.

The Hebrew letter “Hey” can be called a “Mater Lectionis” which means “Mother of Reading” which simply means “Vowel”. The Hebrew letter ‘Hey” can be used as a consonant represented by the letter “H” in English or it can represent the vowel “A” in English which carries the “ah” sound.

One problem with the Hebrew Letter “Hey” being a vowel (English letter “A”) is that The GREEKS did not transliterate this Hebrew letter as an “A” because the GREEK language has a letter that represents the letter “A” and that letter is called “alpha”. Instead The Greeks used the Greek letter “Eta” to represent the Hebrew letter “Hey” because this letter (eta) was closer in pronunciation.

If you transliterate the Hebrew name יְהֹוָה to English using the Hebrew letter “Hey” as a consonant, which is the English letter “H”, you will get YHUH. If you do the same by using the Hebrew letter “Hey” as a vowel which represents the letter “A” in English, you will get YAUA and possibly YHUA.

Here is what I see has happened. It seems as if they have taken the transliterated letter “A” and replaced it with the sound of the letter “ah” so that you get Yahuah. This is one possibility. The next issue is this …

Does the name YAHUAH violate the rules of the language?

Here are the rules of the language again ….

#1 A Hebrew syllable must begin with a consonant. A syllable can be either a consonant plus a vowel [CV] or a consonant plus a vowel plus a consonant [CVC].

#2 Every syllable must begin with one consonant and have only one vowel. The exception would be any WORD that start with the letter “U”; the conjunction.

In the name YAUA (Yahuah), we have three vowels together and a syntax or rule #1 violation. Yahuah is three syllables. If we use this rendition YHUA, we still have three syllables Y-HU-A … look at rule #2 of the language.

man

This name is closer in pronunciation to Yahuah ….

yahu-a

1 Kings 16:1 Then the word of יְהֹוָה came to Jehu יֵהוּא (H3058) the son of Hanani against Baasha, saying ……

The answer lies within the usage of the Hebrew letter Aleph. In the language spelling rules (Orthography), a Hebrew word and/or a syllable must start with a consonant and you cannot have two vowels together in a syllable or word. Words or syllables DO NOT begin with vowels.

The Aleph which is a consonant allows us to begin words or syllables with a vowel sound and it allows us to have two vowels together without violating the rules of the language. For instant, look at אָב “Ab” in English meaning father. The word starts with a consonant “Aleph”, the vowel ‘A’ follows the consonant “Aleph” and then the Hebrew letter “Bet” or the letter “B” [CVC].

In Ancient Hebrew, the letter or vowel “A” with the “ah” sound is placed between consonants. Look at the name for Israel. It should be Yashara’al יִשְׂרָאֵל. The apostrophe symbol represents the Aleph in the transliteration into English. But look, you have two vowels together (the letter “A”) and the apostrophe which is the Aleph (a consonant) separates the two vowels. A vowel/vowel sound follows the Hebrew letter Aleph. Jehu יֵהוּא or Yahu’ has the Aleph at the end of the name. With this in mind, יֵהוּא would be pronounced in English as YaHU’a or Yahu’ah or Yahuah. YHUH or יְהֹוָה cannot be pronounced Yahuah because it violates the syntax of the Hebrew language both modern and ancient.

YHUH has two syllables …. Y-HUH pronounced “YA – HUH” or “Ya -Hu”

The ‘ah” sound is produced by the “A-Type Vowel” and not by the letter “H”. We can see this in how the translators transliterated Psalm 68:4 H3050 Yahh

AHAYAH

Exodus 3:14 And Alahiym said unto Moses, I AM THAT I AM: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you.

15 And Alahiym said moreover unto Moses, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, YHUH Alahiym of your fathers, the Alahiym of Abraham, the Alahiym of Isaac, and the Alahiym of Jacob, hath sent me unto you: this is my name for ever, and this is my memorial unto all generations.

Isaiah 42:8 I [am] YHUH (יְהֹוָה): that [is] my name: and my honor will I not give to another, neither my praise to graven images.

The name YHUH/יְהֹוָה appears more than 6000 times in Scripture but AHAYAH appears twice and that is in Exodus 3:14. My question is this if you are using the name ‘AHAYAH’, “What do you do when you encounter the name יְהֹוָה that appears more than 6000 times in Scripture?” Do you replace it with AHAYAH?

With the usage of AHAYAH, The Most High is making a statement about himself. He is introducing himself to Moses by saying “I AM THE EXISTING ONE”. HAYAH is a verb that means “To Be,To Exist”. However in verse 15, he states his name as a memorial to all generations יְהֹוָה(YHUH). Now … let us look at the many uses in Scripture of the verb “hayah”:

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The term (אהיה) “AHAYAH” appears within Scripture 20 times
outside of Exodus 3:14.

1. Genesis 26:3
2. Genesis 31:3
3. Exodus 3:12
4. Exodus 4:12
5. Exodus 4:15
6. Deuteronomy 31:23
7. Joshua 1:5
8. Joshua 3:7
9. Judges 6:16
10. 2 Samuel 15:34
11. 1 Chronicle 17:13
12. 1 Chronicles 28:6
13. Jeremiah 24:7
14. Jeremiah 30:22
15. Jeremiah 32:38
16. Ezekiel 11:20
17. Ezekiel 36:28
18. Ezekiel 37:23
19. Hosea 14:5
20. Zechariah 8:8

Ahayah is expressed in the form of the phrase “I Will Be.” The first place “Ahayah” can be seen is in Genesis 26:3 but it appears as (הייתי) in Genesis 17:8. It also appears in Exodus 3:12 before it appears in Exodus 3:14.

Exodus 3:12 And he said, Certainly I will be (אהיה) with thee; and this shall be a token unto you, that I HAVE SENT YOU: When you have brought forth the people out of Egypt, you shall serve Alahiym upon this mountain.

Verse 12 indicates the usage of “Ahayah” but Moses realized that this was not his name or even a name. This can be known because of the question Moses asked in verse 13.

When we get to Exodus 3:13, we have to be very careful in how we interpret Hebrew prose (writing style).

Verse 13 And Moses said unto Alahiym, Behold, when I come unto the children of Israel, and shall say unto them, The Alahiym of your fathers hath sent me unto you; and they shall say to me, what is his name? What shall I say unto them?

Alahiym answers part of the question in verse 14 and then he answers part of the same question in verse 15. Notice in verse 14, he did not say that his name was Ahayah. Once again, Ahayah is also used in verse 12 but as the phrase “I Will Be.”

Verse 14 And Alahiym said unto Moses, I WILL BE That I WILL BE (relative clause) and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I WILL BE hath sent me unto you.

[15] And Alahiym said moreover unto Moses, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, YaHUH Alahiym of your fathers, the Alahiym of Abraham, the Alahiym of Isaac, and the Alahiym of Jacob, hath sent me unto you: this is my name for ever, and this is my memorial unto all generations.

An interesting side note: When the Hebrew Scriptures were translated into Greek, AHAYAH was not transliterated as a name but translated as the phrase “I Will Be.”

Jehovah (JHVH)

This name partially recognizes the “A-type Vowel” in the last two letters (VH). The letter “V” is an English letter with German influence upon it. The letter “V” does not appear in Biblical Hebrew. The letter “V” carries the “U” sound in Hebrew. An example of this sound would be in the name Winnie The Pooh.

The letter “O” appears in Modern Hebrew and it can only be generated through vowel points which were added to the Biblical Text. This name also recognizes that two vowels cannot be in one syllable nor can two vowels appear together in one word. The creators of this name made a vowel consonant called the “OV” to compensate for the two vowel rule. Lastly, there is no letter “J” or “J sounding letter” in Hebrew. According to Psalm 68:4, the first two letters in the name is YH pronounced as YAH and not JEH.

Ha Shem?

In Hebrew, this means “The Name”. This is more of a title instead of a personal name. How do we know this? Typically in Hebrew as well as in English, Proper Nouns (Names) do not need a definite article “The” attached to it. We don’t go around saying “The Percy”, “The Nancy”.

Adonai?

This is a Hebrew word meaning “The Lord” or “Lord”. This is a replacement for the sacred name (YHUH). The JEWS thought that YHUH was too sacred to be pronounced.

GOD?

God is the English name given to a singular being in theistic and deistic religions (and other belief systems) who is either the sole deity in monotheism, or a single deity in polytheism.

The earliest written form of the Germanic word god comes from the 6th century Christian Codex Argenteus. The English word itself is derived from the Proto-Germanic guđan. Most linguists agree that the reconstructed Proto-Indo-European form * ghu-tó-m was based on the root * ghau(ə)-, which meant either “to call” or “to invoke”.The Germanic words for god were originally neuter—applying to both genders—but during the process of the Christianization of the Germanic peoples from their indigenous Germanic paganism, the word became a masculine syntactic form. Source: Wikipedia

The word GOD from strong’s concordance means Elohim in Modern Hebrew and Alahiym in Biblical Hebrew. A better English translation would be “Mighty Ones”.

One of the twelve tribes of Israel has the name GAD. This name is pronounced as “GAWD” or “GahD” Click Here

7 Redemptive Names of Alahiym

YHUH-Yar’ah (Jireh) יְהֹוָה יִרְאֵה
“YHUH our provider” – This is also the name Abraham gave to the place where YHUH provided a sacrifice in place of Isaac. (Genesis 22:14)

YHUH-Nasi (Nissi) יְהֹוָה נִסִּי
“Our banner, a banner of love and protection” – Also the name Moses gave to the altar he built after defeating the Amalekites (Exodus 17:15).

YHUH-Shalum (SHALOM) יְהֹוָה שָׁלוֹם
“Our perfect peace” – Also the name Gideon gave to the altar he built at Ophrah (Judges 6:24)

YHUH-Tsadaqanu (TSID-KENU) יְהֹוָה צִדְקֵנוּ
“YHUH is our righteousness” – The name is applied to a future Davidic king who would lead his people to do what is right and thus bring peace (Jeremiah 23:6) and to the restored city of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 33:16).

YHUH-Shamah יְהֹוָה שָׁמָה
[It was] round about eighteen thousand [measures]: and the name of the city from [that] day [shall be], YHUH [is] there Ezekiel 48:35

YHUH-Tsaba יְהֹוָה צָבָא
For thy Maker [is] thine husband; YHUH of hosts [is] his name; and thy Redeemer the Holy One of Israel; The Alahiym of the whole earth shall he be called.

YHUH-Rapha יְהֹוָה רָפָא
“I am YHUH Your Physician or I am YHUH Your Healer” Exodus 15:26.

YHUH pronounced “Ya – HUH” or “Ya -Hu”

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The Name: “YHWH” or “YHVH” or “YHUH”

On November 6, 2011, in The Name, by Milton Carnes

The English alphabet contains these three letters U, V, & W. The SOUNDS of V & W are rather NEW. However, the letters U, V, & W are closely related to each other. They are derived from the SAME SOURCE, coming to the modern world directly from the sixth letter of the ancient Hebrew alef-beth (alpha-bet); a letter commonly expressed today as WAW/UAU/VAV.

The letters U & W are new developments, and are mutations of what began as a Hebrew letter, then transliterated into Greek, and finally Latin. The original Hebrew shape was Y; the Greek shape was also Y, and called UPSILON; the Latin dropped the stem, and it became the letter V. The sound of the Hebrew letter (UAU) is that of the English letter “U” with a double “O” (oo) as in “school”.

The Hebrew letter Uau became the Greek letter Upsilon, and sounded like the “U” in HALLELU YAH.

Within the last 700 years, this letter shaped “V” with the sound of “OO” developed into our modern letters U and W.

Please verify this by using online encyclopedias and other sources. The Tetragrammaton is therefore more accurately rendered as YHUH, standing for the 4 letters YOD-HAY-UAU-HAY.

If preferred, it can be expressed YHVH, as long as it is understood that the “V” shape is sounded as our modern “U”.

The rounded form U began to gain in popularity in the late 1300’s, using the rounded shape within words, but using the V-shape at the beginning of words. The “V” shape originally had the sound of our modern letter U, but the labial sound of “V” (lower lip with upper teeth) is a rather new development; “via” was pronounced “uia”.

Many sources still erroneously imagine the letter “double-U” (W) as they cite the sixth letter of the Hebrew alef-beth as “WAW”, when it should be more properly understood as the Hebrew letter “UAU”. The shape and sound of our modern “W” is not the same as the Hebrew letter, although the Hebrew is the origin of the letter UPSILON – Y – deriving from the Paleo-Hebrew letter having the same shape and sound. The Hebrew letter UAU (Y) is the source of our modern sound “U”. The letter “W” did not exist until it first appeared in certain words as a UU (double – U) during the 14th century. “Witch” was originally spelled “vvitch”.

V and W developed into their modern sounds within the last 700 years from the Hebrew UAU and Greek UPSILON, both shaped Y. The main confusion over these letters is caused by their modern shapes. What we read today as a “V” used to sound like our modern “U”.

Letters are the building-blocks of language. They are like the individual notes of music, which when properly arranged will form a familiar melody. When properly arranged into words properly sounded, letters are the foundation of our thoughts, and give meaning to our speaking and writing.

Many people are becoming aware that translators of The Scriptures have used modern, recently-invented letters to convey the sounds of words or names from older languages, and allowed the distortions of The Greek to influence spellings. Because Greek has no “SH” sound, the Hebrew word SHEMITE became SEMITE (pertaining to the descendants of Shem).

Another example is the letter “J”, having appeared around 1530 CE, developing from the Greek letter, “IOTA”. The use of the Greek IOTA was a desperate attempt to convey the sound of the Hebrew letter YOD. Reality must remain in contact with what we accept to be truth, otherwise our truth is not a reflection of reality.

What are we to think of the modern letter we call “double-u”?

The letter double-U (or just “dub”) doesn’t have a great deal of history to it. There are some who have strained to imagine this letter to have begun during the 7th century CE, when it first appeared by writers of Old English as a pairing of the letter U, (uu).

The word “witch” was originally spelled vvitch (vv). The use of the double-u certainly didn’t begin to become popularized until the 13th century in any other languages. Slowly, a diphthong (dipping of the tongue) evolved in words using the combination eu (or ew), so other languages began to adopt it by writing it as vv (two v shapes).

Still, the shape of “V” was pronounced as a “U” in English, but Germanic influences began to exert pressures, so this spawned the modern letter “V” that we all know and love.

WAS THERE A LETTER “W” IN HEBREW?

The sixth letter of the Hebrew alef-beth is best rendered as a long “o” or long “u” sound. It can be heard in the phrase, “halleluYah” (spelled hay-lamed-lamed-uau-yod-hay). If we are to be consistent, we should render the name of the Hebrew letter UAU instead of WAW. If you perform a personal research on a number of Hebrew words which use this letter (uau), you will come to a fuller understanding of how it is to sound. To use a modern letter to transliterate ancient Hebrew is corrupting, and misleading.

This information is not intended to judge or bash anyone’s personal beliefs, and hopefully any reader who may be disturbed by it will be challenged to do further research on the subject. The distortions of this (UAU) Hebrew letter over the centuries has caused most of the world to lose an accurate understanding of how to pronounce the Name of the Creator, and the Mashiach (Messiah) of Israel.

This excerpt is courtesy of Lew White Fossilized Customs
Kingdom-Info is not associated with nor do we support the teachings of Lew White & Fossilized Customs The purpose of this article is to illustrate a teaching on “The Name”.


The best way to examine whether or not the Tetragrammaton is YHWH, YHVH, or YHUH is to examine The Name from other languages that existed during the time of The Messiah.

Let’s look at the name of Judah or Yahudah in Greek.


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